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London Grammar Perform ‘Baby It’s You’ for ‘Later… With Jools Holland’

The performance came alongside news of the group’s forthcoming third album, which is set to release in February.

Fresh from announcing their long-awaited third album, English trio London Grammar have performed a stunning rendition of recent single “Baby It’s You” for long-running music television show Later… With Jools Holland.

Hitting the stage of the acclaimed series on Friday, the trio performed an immersive version of their August single while bathed in red light and an atmospheric haze. Vocalist Hannah Reid’s voice cut through the haze as she soulfully belted out the haunting chorus as a strobing light system added to the ethereal nature of the performance.

The stunning version of the track came alongside the announcement of their forthcoming third album, Californian Soil, and the release of the album’s title track.

In a press release accompanying the record’s announcement, Reid recalled how her first-hand experiences with misogyny in the music industry helped her to become the leader needed for the group’s new era. With the help of friends and bandmates Dan Rothman and Dot Major, Reid found the power she needed to rise above this, and steer the group in powerful new territories.

“Misogyny is primitive,” Reid explained in a statement, “which is why it is so hard to change. But it is also fearful. It’s about rejecting the thing in yourself which is vulnerable or feminine. Yet everybody has that thing.

“This record is about gaining possession of my own life. You imagine success will be amazing. Then you see it from the inside and ask, why am I not controlling this thing? Why am I not allowed to be in control of it? And does that connect, in any way to being a woman? If so, how can I do that differently?”

London Grammar’s new single, ‘Californian Soil’, is out now, while their album, Californian Soil, will be released on February 12th, 2021 via Dew Process, with pre-orders available now.

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